St. Ann's Roman Catholic Church

St. Ann's Roman Catholic Church

Although Roman Catholics have lived in Lenox since the 1780s, they did not have their own place of worship. Congregants traveled to other parishes and once a month held services in the Lenox Town Hall. In 1870, a small wooden church was erected. As the congregation grew, through an influx of immigrants and summer visitors (most notably Grace Sedgwick) a larger facility was needed. The Norman Gothic Revival stone structure you see today was built in 1911 and designed by Frances Burrall Hoffman. There are four bas relief plaques depicting evangelists Mathew, Mark, Luke, and John surrounding the rose window. A crenelated square tower extends to the right of the front facade and incorporates a porte-cochere with gargoyles at corners. Read more.

<p>Original St. Ann's Church built in 1870.</p> <p>Original St. Ann's Church built in 1870.</p>
<p>St. Ann's replaced in 1911 by the current Romanesque Revival church.</p> <p>St. Ann's replaced in 1911 by the current Romanesque Revival church.</p>